Program of Studies (Course Catalog)

  • Download the program of studies here, or view it below.

    This course catalogue is intended to give students and parents a general overview of the courses offered at Diman, and it should be used when selecting a program of studies and/or courses for the 2019 academic year. Diman Regional recognizes that each student is a unique individual who will possess specific strengths, needs, and learning styles. The courses offered at Diman provide all students the opportunity to develop their capabilities in a variety of content areas and at the appropriate and challenging levels of learning. At Diman, the expectation is that exceptional teaching and learning be the focus of all students, educators, administration, and staff.

    English | Math | Science | Social Studies

    Physical Education & Health | Alternative Electives

English Language Arts Course Offerings

  • The English Language Arts curricula are integrated literature based courses in which students of all four years are grouped heterogeneously. All four levels concentrate on reading comprehension through strategies for active readers, literary analysis, critical thinking skills, vocabulary development, and the writing process. In addition, for enhancement and enjoyment, all four levels are supplemented with novels that correspond to each year of study.

    NAME COURSE # GRADE LEVEL CREDITS
    Honors English Language Arts 9 3201 9 1 5
    English Language Arts 9 3001 9 2 5
    English Language Arts Enrichment 9 3081 9 2 2.5
    English Language Arts 9 7001 9 3 5
    Honors English Language Arts 10 3202 10 1 5
    English Language Arts 10 3002 10 2 5
    English Language Arts Enrichment 10 3082 10 2 5
    English Language Arts 10 7002 10 3 5
    Honors English Language Arts 11 3203 11 1 5
    English Language Arts 11 3003 11 2 5
    Reading Language Arts 11/12 Title 1 3085 11/12 3 2.5
    English Language Arts 11 7003 11 3 5
    AP English Language and Composition 3144 11/12 5 5
    AP English Literature and Composition 3145 11/12 5 5
    Art & Literature Fusion 3326 11/12 2 2.5
    Honors English Language Arts 12 3204 12 1 5
    English Language Arts 12 3004 12 2 5
    Creative Writing 4068 11/12 2 2.5
    English Language Arts 12 7004 12 3 5
    History of Broadway 3325 11/12 2 1.25

    3001/*7001 – ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 9
    5 CREDITS

    The freshman English Language Arts curriculum introduces selections of various genres including fiction, nonfiction, ballad, lyric poetry, personal essay, mystery story and drama, and Shakespearean drama. Critique writing, narrative writing, descriptive writing, persuasive writing and expository speech skills are also developed. Author studies are also explored.

    *7001- In this course, modifications to the above curriculum are made as dictated by students’ Individualized Education Plans.

    3201 – HONORS ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 9
    5 CREDITS

    The freshman honors English Language Arts curriculum focuses and extends the students’ understanding of the various genres offered in the freshman English Language Arts curriculum. Novels will be assigned during the shop cycle interim, as well as, during the academic cycle. These will be the basis for in depth literary analysis presentations before a critical audience for discussion and debate. In addition, emphasis is placed on developing greater proficiency in paragraph development and vocabulary of the writing process.

    *Prerequisites: Enrollment in this course is based upon student placement exam results. As part of this placement exam, students must score at least a 17/20 on the written portion of this test in order to be eligible for Honors English Language Arts 9 placement. Additionally, previous student English scores and overall transcripts will be considered when placing students in this class.

    3081– ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS ENRICHMENT 9
    2.5 CREDITS

    The freshmen Reading Language Arts curriculum initially tests all students with the Stanford Diagnostic Reading and Writing Test. This test enables the reading instructor to tailor each individual student’s instruction and work on skills needed to improve. The curriculum introduces selections of various genres including fiction, nonfiction, ballad, lyric poetry, mystery story and drama, and Shakespearean drama. The media is covered through current events on a weekly basis and debates often ensue. The essay is practiced until students master the format and continuously used as a tool for assessing reading comprehension. Author studies are also explored. Students are post-tested in May to record gains and those who have reached grade level are mainstreamed into the English Language Arts program.

    3002/*7002 – ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 10
    5 CREDITS

    The sophomore English Language Arts curriculum encourages students to grow as critical readers and thinkers while supporting the frameworks for MCAS strategies. The genres studied are fiction, science fiction, realistic fiction, nonfiction, mystery story, poetry, sonnets, Greek drama, and Shakespearean drama. In the sophomore year, an integrated expository writing/speech project is required. An author study of a science fiction writer is investigated. The writing process includes critique, narrative, descriptive and persuasive writing.

    *7002- In this course, modifications to the above curriculum are made as dictated by students’ Individualized Education Plans.

    3202 – HONORS ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 10
    5 CREDITS

    The sophomore English Language Arts curriculum reinforces and expands competencies initiated in freshman level English Language Arts. Students read the various works of the sophomore English Language Arts curriculum and analyze form and purpose of these genres. Novels will be assigned during the shop cycle interim, as well as during the academic cycle, which will be the basis for in depth literary analysis presentations to demonstrate considerations of audience, purpose, and information conveyed. There is also greater emphasis on organization, precision of expression, and wider use of vocabulary to demonstrate their understanding of answering open-ended research questions, while relying upon different sources of information and research techniques.

    *Prerequisites: Students should have earned an 80 or above in their honors level English Language Arts 9 course. Students wishing to move from college prep and into this honors level course must have earned a 90 or above in English Language Arts 9 and have passed the writing placement exam with a score of a 17/20 or higher. Teacher recommendation is also required as a prerequisite for this course.

    **Students wishing to take the writing placement exam for this honors course must see their English teacher(s) prior to April of their freshman year.

    3082 – ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS ENRICHMENT 10
    2.5 CREDITS

    In the sophomore Reading Language Arts trifecta lab, students will be introduced to various MCAS strategies. The course will focus on strategies to complete the open response sections on the MCAS test. The genres of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry will be addressed. Additionally, students in this course are post-tested with the Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test in May to record gains and those who have reached grade level are mainstreamed into the English Language Arts program.

    3003/*7003 – ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 11
    5 CREDITS

    The junior English Language Arts curriculum gives students knowledge of American writers for a sense of the diversity of our country. This course provides students with an awareness of cultural and historical influences on literature. American literature genres include myths, songs, folktales, poetry, sermon, primary sources, legend, fiction, nonfiction and historical narrative. Four author studies are also examined. Students also complete an integrated expository writing/ speech project, as well as critique writing, narrative, descriptive and persuasive process writing.

    *7003- In this course, modifications to the above curriculum are made as dictated by students’ Individualized Education Plans.

    3203 – HONORS ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 11
    5 CREDITS

    Students read the various genres of the junior English Language Arts curriculum and analyze style, form, and historical content. Students develop an understanding of literature as a basis for social commentary, inquiry, and critical analysis. Students will be required to present informal and formal speech presentations. Novels will be assigned during the shop cycle interim, as well as during the academic cycle, which will be the basis for in depth literary analysis presentations to demonstrate considerations of audience, purpose, and information conveyed. Students improve organization, content, paragraph development, level of detail, style, tone, and word choice in their own writing through the writing process. SAT vocabulary and word analogies preparation are an integral part of this course.

    *Prerequisites: Students should have earned an 80 or above in their honors level English Language Arts 10 course. Students wishing to move from college prep and into this honors level course must have earned a 90 or above in English Language Arts 10 and have passed the writing placement exam with a score of a 17/20 or higher. Teacher recommendation is also required as a prerequisite for this course.

    **Students wishing to take the writing placement exam for this honors course must see their English teacher(s) prior to April of their sophomore year.

    3085 – READING LANGUAGE ARTS 11/12 TITLE I LAB
    2.5 CREDITS

    The junior Reading Language Arts curriculum continues to work on skills to enable students to pass the MCAS and to become independent readers. The genres explored are fiction, nonfiction, mystery story, poetry, Shakespearean drama, myths, folktales, legends and historical narratives. Students work on specific skills such as drawing conclusions, reading for concepts, finding the main idea, and using context clues. Literary terms are practiced and the Current Events magazine is read and discussed. An integrated expository writing/speech project is required. Students are post-tested with the Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test in May to record gains and those who have reached grade level are mainstreamed into the English Language Arts program.

    3004/*7004 – ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 12
    5 CREDITS

    The senior English Language Arts curriculum focuses on classic British literature from the Anglo-Saxon Period, the English Renaissance, the Restoration Period, the Romantic and Victorian Eras to contemporary times. The genres are epic poetry, romantic poetry, Victorian poetry, framework stories, sonnets, Shakespearian drama, novels, diaries, and fiction. In addition, students complete an author study on Chaucer. Process writing includes narrative, descriptive, expository, and persuasive writing.

    *7004- In this course, modifications to the above curriculum are made as dictated by students’ Individualized Education Plans.

    3204 – HONORS ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 12
    5 CREDITS

    This is a literature course that provides students with an opportunity to develop their writing through various stages of composing, revising, and editing, while simultaneously developing a critical view of the world surrounding them. While developing an understanding of literature as a basis for enjoyment, social commentary, inquiry, and critical analysis, students in this course also learn to formulate and support a thesis using a number of rhetorical strategies; conduct research; integrate a variety of sources according to the Modern Language Association guidelines; and write in standard, formal English with consideration given to audience, purpose, and context.

    *Prerequisites: Students should have earned an 80 or above in their honors level English Language Arts 11 course. Students wishing to move from college prep and into this honors level course must have earned a 90 or above in English Language Arts 11 and have passed the writing placement exam with a score of a 17/20 or higher. Teacher recommendation is also required as a prerequisite for this course.

    **Students wishing to take the writing placement exam for this honors course must see their English teacher(s) prior to April of their junior year.

    3325 – HISTORY OF BROADWAY
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course is an elective for students who have an interest in drama, theater, music, and film. The primary objective is to expose students to the rich history, heritage, and evolution of the American Musical. It will explore different periods of history in which popular Broadway musicals and Hollywood films are set. Students will learn about New York’s theatrical history through the use of audio and visual media and will examine how the period is represented within each show. Optional field trips to see live performances will be offered.

    3326 – ART & LITERATURE FUSION
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course is an elective for students who have an interest in art, creative expression, and literature. Students will focus on self-expression through personal artwork and creative writing, combined with both ancient and modern poetry and texts. This includes paintings, drawings, and performances, fused with various literary works. This course will foster an appreciation for how the arts, humanities, and literature fuse together in today’s world. Students will design and keep an art journal of their work. Museum visits, as well as poetry slams and creative workshops may be offered.

    3144 – AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION
    5 CREDITS

    The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works.

    *Prerequisites: Students should have earned a grade of A- or better in their prior year English class. They must also take a writing placement examination.

    **Weighted Course towards GPA

    ***Course goals and further descriptions can be found at collegeboard.org

    4068 – CREATIVE WRITING
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course is an elective designed for students to create original forms of descriptive writing, poetry, drama and fiction through the use of vocabulary development and creative writing techniques. The purpose of this course is to allow students to fully grasp literature and creative writing’s deep relevance to the life of the individual, promote creativity and community outreach at the writing-specific and interdisciplinary levels, equip members with useful and current skills in communication and expression, and foster the love of the written word. Through lecture, discussion, assigned reading, writing exercises, short story (or novel chapter) writing, and critiques of student writing in a workshop mode, the students will critically examine the elements of literary creation. The students will keep a journal and prepare a portfolio of their work.

Mathematics Department Course Offerings

  • The study of mathematics is an integral component of a variety of academic and vocational disciplines. All mathematics curricula were redesigned in 2016 to meet the various needs of Diman Regional Vocational Technical High School students to prepare them for MCAS 2.0, PSAT/SAT, and Accuplacer in accordance with NCTM and Common Core guidelines. Graduates who are continuing their education by enrolling in a two year or four year institution, enlisting in the military, or entering the workforce will be well prepared for the future after completing the comprehensive four year mathematics program.

    NAME COURSE # GRADE LEVEL CREDITS
    Honors Algebra 1 1111 9 1 5
    Honors Geometry 1032 9/10 1 5
    Geometry 1052 9/10 2 5
    Algebra 1 1063 9 2 5
    Topics of Algebra 1 1301/7421 9 3 5
    Mathematics Enrichment 9 1411 9 2 2.5
    Honors Geometry 1032 9/10 1 5
    Honors Algebra 2 1053 10/11 1 5
    Geometry 1052 9/10 2 5
    Topics of Geometry 1302/7422 10 3 5
    Mathematics Enrichment 10 1412 10 2 2.5
    Honors Pre-Calculus 1034 11 1 5
    Honors Algebra 2 1053 10/11 1 5
    Algebra 2 1113 10/11 2 5
    Topics of Algebra 2 1313/7033 11 3 5
    Grade 11/ 12 Math Lab 1300 11/12 3 2.5
    Honors Introduction to Calculus I 1284 12 1 5
    Honors Pre-Calculus 1034 11/12 1 5
    Advanced Placement Statistics 1500 12 5 5
    Advanced Algebra & Trigonometry 1165 11/12 2 5
    Statistics 1454 11/12 2 5
    Business Math 1244/7084 12 2/3 5
    Grade 11/ 12 SAT/Accuplacer Prep 1994 11/12 3 2.5
    Introduction to Accounting 1996 11/12 2 2.5

    1301/ **7421 – TOPICS OF ALGEBRA 1
    5 credits

    This course introduces such topics as operations with real numbers and order of operations.  Students will also solve linear equations and inequalities with one variable. Students will then graph linear equations and inequalities with two variables using tables and the slope intercept method. Students will also be introduced to parallel and perpendicular lines.  They will also be introduced to the concept of using slope intercept to write the equation of a line.  Students will be introduced to solving systems of equations using substitution, elimination and graphing. Scientific notation and rules for exponents will also be covered. Students will be introduced to the uses of exponential growth and decay as they study simple compound interest and depreciation. 

    *This course is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education (with remediation) at a two-year college, post-secondary vocational school, or intend to enter the work force or enlist in the military.

    **7421 – A modified curriculum course for students on Individualized Education Plans.

    1063 – ALGEBRA 1
    5 credits

    In this course, students will use algebra to solve one and two variable equations, follow more complex order of operations as well as graphing linear equations using tables and slope intercept method.  Students will also graph inequalities. Students will solve systems of equations using graphing, substitution and elimination. The Power Rule of Exponents will also be introduced. Students will also work with exponents, polynomial expressions both multiplying and factoring, and will be introduced to the Quadratic Formula.

    *This course is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education at a two or four year college, post-secondary vocational school, or intend to enter the work force or enlist in the military.

    1111 – HONORS ALGEBRA 1
    5 credits

    In this accelerated paced course, students will use algebra to solve one and two variable equations, inequalities, follow more complex order of operations as well as graphing linear equations using tables and slope intercept method, and graphing inequalities.  Students will summarize, represent, and interpret data on two categorical and quantitative variables.  Students will solve systems of equations using substitution, eliminations and graphing.  Students will also learn to apply the Power Rule for exponents as well as simplify complex fractions.  Emphasis will be placed on problem solving and analysis.

    *This course is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education at a four year college.

    1302/**7422 – TOPICS OF GEOMETRY
    5 credits

    This course introduces such topics as properties of polygons, properties of circles, volume, area and perimeter of compound figures.  Students will also become familiar with properties of triangles, similar and congruent figures, and the Pythagorean Theorem. Students will also solve simple problems involving parallel lines.  Algebra concepts will be integrated where appropriate.  Key student-friendly objectives including academic vocabulary will be introduced. Students will learn to use appropriate tools strategically.

    *Prerequisite: Topics of Algebra 1 or Algebra 1 with teacher recommendation.

    **This course is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education (with remediation) at a two-year college, post-secondary vocational school, or intend to enter the work force or enlist in the military.

    ***7422 – A modified curriculum course for students on Individualized Education Plans.

    1052 – GEOMETRY
    5 credits

    This course covers two and three dimensional geometric figures and their properties.  In addition, students will study pairs of angles, the properties of parallel line, similar and congruent figures, right triangles, special right triangles and circles.  Students will use formulas to find area of plane figures, and the surface area and volume of solid figures. Algebra will be integrated where appropriate.

    *Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or Topics of Algebra 1 with compensatory work after teacher recommendation.

    **This course is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education at a two or four year college, post-secondary vocational school, or intend to enter the work force or enlist in the military.

    1032 HONORS GEOMETRY
    5 credits

    This in-depth study of theorems and postulates uses two column proofs and expects students to form conclusions based given information.  Topics which are covered at an accelerated rate include pairs of angles, properties of polygons and circles, properties of right triangles, properties of parallel lines, and the proofs of congruent and similar triangles. Students will use formulas to find area of plane figures, and the surface area and volume of solid figures. Emphasis is placed on logical reasoning and problem solving using algebra where appropriate.  Prior subject knowledge is expected.  Students must be able to utilize appropriate academic language to express complex mathematical concepts.  Successful students will be able to demonstrate mastery on rigorous assessments.

    *Prerequisite: Grade 9 students enrolled upon demonstrating mastery on placement exam.

    **This course is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education at a four year college.

    1313/**7033 – TOPICS OF ALGEBRA 2
    5 credits

    The course begins with an introduction to quadratic functions and their applications.  Students will learn to solve quadratic equations using a variety of methods, including the quadratic formula.  Students will also be introduced to complex numbers.  Students will perform operations on polynomial expressions.  Students will be introduced to radical expressions.  They will also learn to multiply and divide these expressions.  This course concludes with a study of rational exponents.

    *Prerequisite: Topics of Geometry or Geometry with teacher recommendation.

    *This course is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education (with remediation) at a two-year college, post-secondary vocational school, or intend to enter the work force or enlist in the military.

    **7033- This is a modified curriculum course for students on Individualized Education Plans.

    1113 – ALGEBRA 2
    5 credits

    This course continues the study of algebraic concepts with quadratics and polynomials.  An in-depth study of quadratic equations will help students identify, solve, and use technology to graph quadratic functions.  Students will examine the complex number system.  Operations on polynomials will be performed and higher-order equations will be solved with both real and complex roots.  An in-depth study of radicals will allow students to simplify and rationalize higher-order roots and rational exponents as well as solve rational equations.  Exponential functions and their applications will also be considered.

    *Prerequisite: Geometry or Topics of Geometry with compensatory work after teacher recommendation.

    **This course is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education at a two or four year college, post-secondary vocational school, or intend to enter the work force or enlist in the military.

    1053 – HONORS ALGEBRA 2
    5 credits

    This accelerated paced course will feature sophisticated methods of solving linear, quadratic, and higher-order equations.  Matrices will be used to solve for three or more unknowns in a system of equations with a focus on applications of simultaneous equations.  Students will be able to simplify, classify, and solve equations with higher-order polynomials and will apply the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra to find real and complex solutions.  An in-depth study of radicals will allow students to simplify and rationalize higher-order roots and rational exponents.  Students will use combinatorics to simulate real-life situations.  Students will be able to work with rational expressions and equations and find and describe points of discontinuity on their related graphs.  Sequences and series will be evaluated as well as standard deviations.  When time allows, the mathematics of finance is considered.  Emphasis is placed on analysis of applications throughout the course.

    *Prerequisite: Honors Geometry or Geometry with compensatory work after teacher recommendation.

    **This course is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education at a four year college.

    1165 ADVANCED ALGEBRA & TRIGONOMETRY
    5 credits

    This course begins with students exploring how to simplify, add, subtract, multiply & divide rational functions and solve rational equations. Students will also study right triangle trigonometry with applications of the six trigonometric functions and their graphical representations.  Students will define general angles and use radian measure.  They will evaluate trig functions of any angle and their inverse functions of sine, cosine and tangent. Students will explore oblique triangles, finding missing lengths, sides and angles using the Laws of Sines and Laws of Cosines. Extensive use of the graphing calculator is required throughout the course.

    *Prerequisite: Algebra 2 or Honors Algebra 2 with teacher recommendation.

    **This course is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education at a two or four year college, post-secondary vocational school or intend to enter the work force or enlist in the military.

    1034 HONORS PRE-CALCULUS
    5 credits

    This upper level course will begin with the use, as well as manipulation of exponential and logarithmic functions – both common and natural.  It continues with angle measurements in radians, revolutions, and degrees. Students will also study right triangle trigonometry with applications of the six trigonometric functions and their graphical representations.  Additionally, modeling of sinusoidal waves using sine and cosine functions (amplitude, period, etc.), inverse functions of sine, cosine, and tangent with basic trig identities, Laws of Sines, and Laws of Cosines with applications to conic sections will also be investigated.  Students will also become familiar with the properties and translations of parabolas, circles, ellipses and hyperbolas. Extensive use of the graphing calculator is required throughout the course.

    *Prerequisite: Honors Algebra 2.

    **This course is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education at a four year college.

    1284 HONORS INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS I
    5 credits

    This course builds on the foundational topics introduced in pre-calculus. Students will study two and three dimensional vectors, polar equations and their graphs, limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications. Students will apply these concepts to a wide range of real-world problems, including rates of change and velocity/acceleration.

    *Prerequisite: Honors Pre-calculus.

    **This course is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education at a four year college with a major requiring Calculus.

    1411 – TOPICS OF ALGEBRA 1 LAB
    0.83 credits

    This supplementary course is intended for students whose math skills are below grade level. The course supports such topics as operations with real numbers and order of operations.  In addition, students learn to graph both linear equations using tables and slope-intercept method and inequalities.  Students are introduced to solving systems of equations using substitution or elimination.

    *Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Topics of Algebra

    *This supplementary course is taken in conjunction with Topics of Algebra 1 and is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education at a two-year college, post-secondary vocational school, or intend to enter the work force.

    1412 – TOPICS OF GEOMETRY LAB
    0.83 credits

    This supplementary course is intended for students whose math skills are below grade level. The course supports such topics as properties of polygons, properties of circles, volume, area and perimeter of compound figures.  Students will also become familiar with properties of triangles, similar and congruent figures and the Pythagorean Theorem. Students will also solve simple problems involving parallel lines.

    *Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Topics of Geometry.

    **This supplementary course is taken in conjunction with Topics of Geometry and is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education at a two-year college, post-secondary vocational school, or intend to enter the work force. 

    1300 – GRADE 11/12 TITLE I MATH LAB
    1.25 credits

    This supplementary course is intended for students whose math skills are below grade level. Students begin with a brief review of topics covered in Algebra 1 and continue with systems of equations, rules for exponents and radical expressions.  The course includes introduction to matrices, adding and multiplying matrices, quadratic equations, complex numbers, the quadratic formula and its applications, dividing polynomials, combinations and permutations, radical expressions – multiplying and dividing, and rational exponents.

    *Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Topics of Algebra 2, Topics of Advanced Algebra & Trigonometry, or Business Math.

    **This supplementary course is taken in conjunction with Topics of Algebra 2 and is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education at a two-year college, post-secondary vocational school, or intend to enter the work force.

    1454 – STATISTICS
    5 credits

    Students will learn how to analyze and interpret data as well as justify their conclusions.  Topics include: displaying categorical and quantitative data appropriately, distribution analysis, determining correlation between two variables, making predictions, collecting data and the basics of probability.  Students will use technology to aide in all computations and focus on what the numbers mean in the context of the problem.

    *Prerequisite: Algebra 2 or Topics of Algebra 2 with teacher recommendation.

    **This course is suited for college-bound seniors.

    1244 / **7084 – BUSINESS MATH
    5 credits

    This course is designed for career bound seniors.  Students will be introduced to the mathematical skills and concepts needed to be successful in their personal finances and in their business.  Topics such as payroll & salary, managing personal income, budgeting, credit, banking services, insurance, home and car ownership and rental, and personal taxes will be explored in depth.

    *Prerequisite: Topics of Algebra 2 or Algebra 2 with teacher recommendation.

    **This course is suited for college-bound seniors.

    ***7084 – This is a modified curriculum course for students on Individualized Education Plans.

    1500 – ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS
    5 credits

    The AP Statistics course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based college course in statistics. The course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. There are four themes in the AP Statistics course: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students use technology, investigations, problem solving, and writing as they build conceptual understanding.

    *Prerequisite: Honors Algebra 2 with teacher recommendation.

    **This course is suited for college-bound seniors.

    1994 – GRADES 11/12 SAT/ACT PREP  
    1.25 credits

    This course is designed for students who intend to take the SAT or ACT exam. Students in this course begin with a brief review of topics covered on the exams.  The course includes an SAT Prep review book with practice SAT exams.  Student will also use online ACT and SAT resources.

    *This is a supplementary course which is taken in conjunction with a junior or senior level course and is suited for students who intend to continue their post-secondary education at a two-year college, four-year college, or post-secondary vocational school.

    1996 – INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING  
    1.25 credits

    Students will learn the importance of accounting, the main accounting concepts, and how they form the basis for generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP).  Students will learn how to use the basic accounting equation and understand how to analyze basic business transactions.  They will learn about assets, liabilities, owners’ equity, revenues, and expenses.

    An introduction to formal record keeping and the steps involved in the accounting process including transaction analysis, chart of account, general journal, posting process, journalizing, and preparing financial statements.

    Students will learn how the income statement and the balance sheet relate.  Students will be introduced to the two financial statements that are reflected in the accounting equation.  They will learn how to prepare a trial balance and financial statements including an income statement and a balance sheet.

Science Department Course Offerings

  • The Diman science curriculum is aligned to the Massachusetts Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) frameworks. Students are enrolled in either biology or physics in their freshmen year, depending on their aptitude in science and math and their physical or life science related vocational interests. Students learn problem solving skills and gain hands on experience through lecture, demonstrations, and laboratory experiments that help prepare them for their vocational shops, post-secondary education, and their future careers. Diman students take the high school biology or physics Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) test in the end of their sophomore year to meet high school science graduation requirements. Diman science teachers are highly qualified under NCLB and ESSA.

    NAME COURSE # GRADE LEVEL CREDITS
    Physics First I 2231 9 ? 5
    Honors Physics First I 2331 9 1 5
    Honors Biology 9 2221 9 1 5
    Biology 9 2021 9 2 5
    Honors Physics First II 2332 10 1 5
    Honors Biology 10 2222 10 1 5
    Biology 10 2022 10 2 5
    Honors Chemistry I 2133 11 1 5
    Honors Applied Physics I 2333 11 1 5
    Anatomy & Physiology I 2303 11 2 5
    Applied Physics I 2053 11 2 5
    Chemistry I 2033 11 2 5
    Honors Applied Physics II 2324 12 1 5
    Honors Chemistry II 2134 12 1 5
    Honors Accelerated Biology 2300 11/12 1 5
    Advanced Placement Chemistry 2135 12 5 5
    Anatomy & Physiology II 2304 12 2 5
    Applied Physics II 2054 12 2 5
    Chemistry II 2034 12 2 5
    Topics in Biology/Forensics 2224 11/12 2 5
    Marine Biology 2063 11/12 2 5
    Zoology 2225 11/12 2 2.5
    Current Events in Science 2353 11/12 2 2.5

    2021 – BIOLOGY 9
    5 CREDITS

    This course is aligned with the Massachusetts State Frameworks and includes an overview of the chemistry of life, cell structure and function, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, genetics, evolution, and biodiversity. It is the first of two courses designed for students who must take the MCAS Biology Test.

    2221 – HONORS BIOLOGY 9
    5 CREDITS

    This course is aligned with the Massachusetts State Frameworks and includes an overview of the chemistry of life, cell structure and function, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, genetics, evolution, and biodiversity. The curriculum includes activities, labs and projects to enhance the learning of the student. Placement is based on the Diman honors criteria. It is the first of two courses designed for students who must meet the state requirement on the MCAS Biology Test as part of the graduation requirement for a high school diploma.

    2331 – HONORS PHYSICS FIRST I
    5 CREDITS

    This course is aligned with the Massachusetts State Frameworks and includes the study of Newton’s three laws of motion, potential and kinetic energy, work, power, momentum, impulse, conservation of energy and momentum, temperature, heat and heat transfer, simple machines, and machine efficiency. Placement is based on Diman’s honors criteria. It is the first of two courses designed for students who must meet the state requirements on the MCAS Physics Test as part of the graduation requirements for a high school diploma.

    2231 – PHYSICS FIRST I
    5 CREDITS

    This course is aligned with the Massachusetts State Frameworks and includes the study of Newton’s three laws of motion, potential and kinetic energy, work, power, momentum, impulse, conservation of energy and momentum, temperature, heat and heat transfer, simple machines, and machine efficiency.

    2022 – BIOLOGY 10
    5 CREDITS

    Biology 10 is aligned with the Massachusetts State Frameworks and includes an overview of the classifications or organisms, populations, ecosystems, biological communities, the environment, introduction to body structure, and an in-depth study of eight organ systems. It is the second of two courses designed for students who must take the MCAS Biology Test.

    *Prerequisite: Biology 9

    2222 – HONORS BIOLOGY 10
    5 CREDITS

    This course is aligned with the Massachusetts State Frameworks and includes an overview of the chemistry of life, cell structure and function, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, genetics, evolution, and biodiversity. The curriculum includes activities, labs and projects to enhance the learning of the student. It is the second of two courses designed for students who must meet the state requirement on the MCAS Biology Test as part of the graduation requirement for a high school diploma.

    *Prerequisite: Honors Biology 9 (2221) or teacher permission

    2332 – HONORS PHYSICS FIRST II
    5 CREDITS

    This course is aligned with the Massachusetts State Frameworks and includes the study of electricity, magnetism, electromotive forces, parallel and series circuit design, Ohms law, Kirchhoff’s law, waves, electromagnetic waves (light), and optics. The curriculum includes demonstrations, activities, and labs to enhance the learning of students. Placement is based on the Diman’s honors criteria. It is the first of two courses designed for students who must meet the state requirements on the MCAS Physics Test as part of the graduation requirements for a high school diploma.

    *Prerequisite: Honors Physics First I (Course 2331) or teacher permission

    2053 – APPLIED PHYSICS I
    5 CREDITS

    This course is part of a hands-on physics program that studies four unifying concepts and systems: mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal. Experiments include levers and pulleys, thermometers, conveyor belts, and electrical circuits.

    2033 – CHEMISTRY I
    5 CREDITS

    This course is the study of matter. The content of this course includes modern atomic theory, how chemicals combine, formulas and equations, quantum theory, electron arrangement, chemical and physical properties, and states of matter.

    2333 – HONORS APPLIED PHYSICS I
    5 CREDITS

    This course is a hands-on physics program that studies four unifying concepts and systems: mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal. Experiments include levers and pulleys, thermometers, conveyor belts, and electrical circuits.

    2303 – ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I
    5 CREDITS

    This course includes a study of structures, functions, and dysfunctions of major systems of the body. Topics include an introduction to structural units, tissues and membranes, the skeletal system, the integumentary system, and nutrition. Career opportunities in medicine- related fields are examined.

    2133 – HONORS CHEMISTRY I
    5 CREDITS

    This course is the study of matter. The content of this course includes modern atomic theory, how chemicals combine, formulas and equations, quantum theory, electron arrangement, chemical and physical properties, and states of matter.

    2300 – HONORS ACCELERATED BIOLOGY
    5 CREDITS

    This one-year course will cover the major concepts associated with Biology 9 and Biology 10. As this course will occur in a one-year format (as opposed to a two-year design), Honors Accelerated Biology will be fast-paced and rigorous. Students enrolled in this course should be prepared for several hours of homework per week. Most reading for this course will take place at home, and discussions/application will be covered in class.

    *Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation

    2304 – ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II
    5 CREDITS

    This course includes a study of structures, functions, and dysfunctions of major systems of the body. Topics include blood, the circulatory system, the lymphatic system, the respiratory system, the digestive system, the excretory system, and the reproductive system. Career opportunities in medicine-related fields are examined.

    *Prerequisite: Anatomy & Physiology I.

    2054 – APPLIED PHYSICS II
    5 CREDITS

    This course is a continuation of Applied Physics I. This course includes the study of electricity, magnetism, electromotive forces, parallel and series circuit design, Ohms law, Kirchhoff’s law, waves, electromagnetic waves (light), and optics. The curriculum includes demonstrations, activities, and labs to enhance the learning of students.

    *Prerequisite: Applied Physics I.

    2034 – CHEMISTRY II
    5 CREDITS

    Chemistry is the study of matter. This course continues the study of chemical techniques and principles from Chemistry I. The content of this course includes chemical reactions, mass relationships, solutions and concentrations, acids and bases, and oxidation and reduction reactions.

    *Prerequisite: Chemistry I.

    2324 – HONORS APPLIED PHYSICS II
    5 CREDITS

    This course is a continuation of Applied Physics I. This course includes the study of electricity, magnetism, electromotive forces, parallel and series circuit design, Ohms law, Kirchhoff’s law, waves, electromagnetic waves (light), and optics. The curriculum includes demonstrations, activities, and labs to enhance the learning of students.

    *Prerequisite: Applied Physics I.

    2134 – HONORS CHEMISTRY II
    5 CREDITS

    Chemistry is the study of matter. This course continues the study of chemical techniques and principles from Chemistry I. The content of this course includes chemical reactions, mass relationships, solutions and concentrations, kinetics and equilibrium, acids and bases, and oxidation and reduction reactions. This course also incorporates a project-based component and may involve cross-disciplinary collaborations. Students will work in teams to devise and execute Honors Project investigations involving independent laboratory work, planning, and presentation of results.

    *Prerequisite: Chemistry I.

    2135 – ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY
    5 CREDITS

    This course continues the study of chemical techniques and principles from Chemistry I. This is a highly rigorous, fast-paced college-level course which covers a wide breadth of advanced material in deep detail. This course has a strong mathematical focus and requires independent completion of online lesson materials as well as extensive readings. An online summer preparatory course is required preceding the beginning of this class. The College Board AP Chemistry exam must be passed to earn college credit for this course.

    *Prerequisite: Honors Chemistry I, Pre-calculus or Advanced Algebra, 10- 15 hour/week home study commitment with online access.

    2063 – MARINE BIOLOGY
    5 CREDITS

    This course is an elective science course for upperclassmen. This course covers the basic principles of marine science, marine organisms, and the different marine ecosystems.

    2224 – TOPICS IN BIOLOGY/FORENSICS
    5 CREDITS

    This course gives the student instruction in forensic science. Topics to be covered include evidence collection, the court system, fingerprint evidence, blood evidence, forensic anthropology, and what occurs to the body after death. Students will be certified to serve in Fall River Youth Court and be required to perform at least four hours of community service at the Youth Court

    2225 – ZOOLOGY
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course explores the twenty-one major animal phyla. The focus of this course will be structure and function and may include observation of preserved members of each group and dissection. Other areas to be explored are the effects animals have on ecology and the biology and care of domestic animals (cats, dogs, farm animals, etc.).

    2353 – CURRENT EVENTS IN SCIENCE
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course provides students with an increased knowledge of their environment and the vital science-based issues of the day. Students will be urged to develop opinions and rationale for the events occurring around them and to foster a sense of environmental responsibility to their local community, the nation, and the world.

    *Prerequisite: Anatomy & Physiology I.

    2054 – APPLIED PHYSICS II
    5 CREDITS

    This course is a continuation of Applied Physics I. This course includes the study of electricity, magnetism, electromotive forces, parallel and series circuit design, Ohms law, Kirchhoff’s law, waves, electromagnetic waves (light), and optics. The curriculum includes demonstrations, activities, and labs to enhance the learning of students.

    *Prerequisite: Applied Physics I.

    2034 – CHEMISTRY II
    5 CREDITS

    Chemistry is the study of matter. This course continues the study of chemical techniques and principles from Chemistry I. The content of this course includes chemical reactions, mass relationships, solutions and concentrations, acids and bases, and oxidation and reduction reactions.

    *Prerequisite: Chemistry I.

    2324 – HONORS APPLIED PHYSICS II
    5 CREDITS

    This course is a continuation of Applied Physics I. This course includes the study of electricity, magnetism, electromotive forces, parallel and series circuit design, Ohms law, Kirchhoff’s law, waves, electromagnetic waves (light), and optics. The curriculum includes demonstrations, activities, and labs to enhance the learning of students.

    *Prerequisite: Applied Physics I.

    2134 – HONORS CHEMISTRY II
    5 CREDITS

    Chemistry is the study of matter. This course continues the study of chemical techniques and principles from Chemistry I. The content of this course includes chemical reactions, mass relationships, solutions and concentrations, kinetics and equilibrium, acids and bases, and oxidation and reduction reactions. This course also incorporates a project-based component and may involve cross-disciplinary collaborations. Students will work in teams to devise and execute Honors Project investigations involving independent laboratory work, planning, and presentation of results.

    *Prerequisite: Chemistry I.

    2135 – ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY
    5 CREDITS

    This course continues the study of chemical techniques and principles from Chemistry I. This is a highly rigorous, fast-paced college-level course which covers a wide breadth of advanced material in deep detail. This course has a strong mathematical focus and requires independent completion of online lesson materials as well as extensive readings. An online summer preparatory course is required preceding the beginning of this class. The College Board AP Chemistry exam must be passed to earn college credit for this course.

    *Prerequisite: Honors Chemistry I, Pre-calculus or Advanced Algebra, 10- 15 hour/week home study commitment with online access.

    2063 – MARINE BIOLOGY
    5 CREDITS

    This course is an elective science course for upperclassmen. This course covers the basic principles of marine science, marine organisms, and the different marine ecosystems.

    2224 – TOPICS IN BIOLOGY/FORENSICS
    5 CREDITS

    This course gives the student instruction in forensic science. Topics to be covered include evidence collection, the court system, fingerprint evidence, blood evidence, forensic anthropology, and what occurs to the body after death. Students will be certified to serve in Fall River Youth Court and be required to perform at least four hours of community service at the Youth Court

    2225 – ZOOLOGY
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course explores the twenty-one major animal phyla. The focus of this course will be structure and function and may include observation of preserved members of each group and dissection. Other areas to be explored are the effects animals have on ecology and the biology and care of domestic animals (cats, dogs, farm animals, etc.). 2353 – CURRENT EVENTS IN SCIENCE 2.5 CREDITS This course provides students with an increased knowledge of their environment and the vital science-based issues of the day. Students will be urged to develop opinions and rationale for the events occurring around them and to foster a sense of environmental responsibility to their local community, the nation, and the world.

Social Studies Course Offerings

  • The history and social studies curricula are aligned with Massachusetts State Frameworks and are designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and judgment to become responsible citizens of the nation and to have an understanding of world issues.

    NAME COURSE # GRADE LEVEL CREDITS
    Honors U S History I 4111 9 1 5
    U.S. History I 4011 9 2 5
    Honors U.S. History II 4022 10 1 5
    U.S. History II 4012 10 2 5
    Local History 4066 10 2 2.5
    Honors World History 4224 12 1 5
    World History 4124 12 2 5
    Current Events 4053 11/12 2 2.5
    Sociology 4064 11/12 2 2.5
    Introduction to Law 4065 11/12 2 2.5
    History of Science and Technology 4055 11/12 2 2.5
    Topics in Personal Finance 4444 11/12 2 2.5
    Introduction to Psychology 4113 11/12 2 2.5
    20th Century History through Music and Culture 4114 11/12 2 2.5
    History of Sports and Leisure 4068 11/12 2 2.5

    4011 – U.S. HISTORY I
    5 CREDITS

    This course examines the historical and intellectual origins of the United States during the Revolutionary and Constitutional eras. The basic framework of American democracy and the basic concepts of American government are studied. Students also study America’s westward expansion, the establishment of political parties, economic and social change, the growth of sectional conflict, the Civil War and its consequences, and finally, Reconstruction.

    4111 – HONORS US HISTORY I
    5 CREDITS

    This course examines the historical and intellectual origins of the United States during the Revolutionary and Constitutional eras. The basic framework of American democracy and the basic concepts of American government are studied. Students also study America’s westward expansion, the establishment of political parties, economic and social change, the growth of sectional conflict, the Civil War and its consequences, and finally, Reconstruction. Honors level U. S. History will require students to analyze the important moments in the nation’s development. An important goal of this course is to foster the development of the student’s ability to think critically and read and write proficiently. *Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation, entrance writing assessment for all students coming from college prep history, grade over 90% in previous history class. All honors students will be assigned required summer reading. **Students who are having difficulty with the honors curriculum are subject to removal. They will be placed into a college prep level class. Students will be identified by November 1st. After November 1st, students may not be able to be moved.

    4012 – U.S. HISTORY II
    5 CREDITS

    Students will examine the political, social, economic, and cultural aspects of the United States beginning in the mid-19th century through 1945. Topics to be covered include industrialization, labor organization, urban growth, American imperialism, progressive reforms, World War I, The Great Depression, and World War II. Social and political trends are also addressed. Students in this course will identify the ways that these important historical themes changed the United States and impacted the development of the nation.

    4066 – LOCAL HISTORY
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course explores the history of the settlement, native population, conflict, and industrial and cultural growth of the Greater Fall River Area. It will focus upon the contributions of key individuals to local industry and history.

    4022 – HONORS U.S. HISTORY II
    5 CREDITS

    This course examines the political, social, economic and cultural aspects of the United States beginning in the mid-19th century through 1945. Topics to be covered include industrialization, labor organization, urban growth, American imperialism, progressive reforms, World War I, The Great Depression, and World War II. Honors level U. S. History will require students to analyze the important moments in the nation’s development. An important goal of this course is to foster the development of the student’s ability to think critically and read and write proficiently. Research reports, oral presentations, essays, projects, and primary and secondary source readings will be assigned. *Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation, entrance writing assessment for all students coming from college prep history, grade over 90% in previous history class. All honors students will be assigned required summer reading. **Students who are having difficulty with the honors curriculum are subject to removal. They will be placed into a college prep level class. Students will be identified by November 1st. After November 1st, students may not be able to be moved.

    4124 – WORLD HISTORY
    5 CREDITS

    This course examines the origins and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, political and social reform in 19th century Europe, as well as imperialism in Africa, Asia, and South America. Also studied are the military and economic events of the 19th and 20th centuries, including the rise of nationalism, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the Russian and Chinese Revolutions, the Cold War and its aftermath.

    4224 – HONORS WORLD HISTORY
    5 CREDITS

    This course covers a wide range of topics from the enlightenment in Europe to the Cold War Era. A focus will be placed on the student’s ability to research and compose college level essays pertaining to history and political matters. This course will examine the varied history of countries from different continents. The intention is to understand the current world climate by examining past events. A critical goal of this course is to foster the development of the student’s ability to read and write proficiently. Research reports, oral presentations, essays, projects, and primary and secondary reading will be assigned.

    *Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation, entrance writing assessment for all students coming from college prep history, grade over 90% in previous history class. All honors students will be assigned required summer reading. **Students who are having difficulty with the honors curriculum are subject to removal. They will be placed into a college prep level class. Students will be identified by November 1st. After November 1st, students may not be able to be moved.

    4053 – CURRENT EVENTS
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course provides students with an increased knowledge of their environment and the vital issues of the day. Values of citizenship and civic concern are stressed. Students also develop a geographic knowledge of the areas under discussion. Students will be urged to develop opinions and rationale for the events occurring around them and to foster a sense of civic responsibility to their local community, the nation, and the world.

    4064 – SOCIOLOGY
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course provides students with knowledge of the function of the basic units of society and the institutions which aid these units. Students in this course study the concepts, principles, theories, and methods used by sociologists in the examination of social life. The utilities of sociological inquiry are applied to contemporary social issues and events to make sociology meaningful for the student.

    4444 – TOPICS IN PERSONAL FINANCE
    2.5 CREDITS

    Students will develop an understanding of the important financial responsibilities of individuals in a global economy. Personal banking, mortgages, credit, loans, savings, stocks and bonds, and more will be introduced. Major economic principles and theories will be presented. Students will explore the relationship between individual citizens, capitalist principles, and government involvement in the financial markets. Emphasis will be placed on having young adults make sound and responsible financial decisions.

    4113 – INTRODUCTION OF PSYCHOLOGY
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course is designed to help students develop an insight into their own psychological processes and those of others. Members of this course will be provided with an introduction to the content and scope of psychology as a behavioral science and will study of such topics as development, adjustment, learning, intelligence, motivation, emotion, and personality.

    4055 – HISTORY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course examines the history of scientific and technological development and their role in culture and society. From the earliest scientific ideas to be found in Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, and Ancient China, to Greek Science, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Modern Era, the course examines the progress of scientific thought. The course addresses issues such as societal attitudes toward science and how culture plays a role scientific and technological development. A philosophical analysis of the advances, functions, and implications of science is used to study how scientific and technological advancements have changed over time and how these changes have impacted our world.

    4065 – INTRODUCTION TO LAW
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course will serve as an introduction to the legal system, including procedure and structure. The course will also focus on the constitutional protections of due process and the jury system.

    4114 – 20TH CENTURY HISTORY THROUGH MUSIC AND CULTURE
    2.5 CREDITS

    A study of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States in the 20th century through the lens of music and culture. Emphasis will be placed on how musical trends have been impacted by reform, war, social injustice and prosperity in the post-WWII era. 4066 – HISTORY OF SPORTS AND LEISURE 2.5 CREDITS This course will examine historical events through the lens of sports. It will also examine societal impacts of sports.

    4068 – HISTORY OF SPORTS AND LEISURE
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course will examine historical events through the lens of sports. It will also examine societal impacts of sports.

Physical Education and Health Course Offerings

  • Physical Education and Health, as instructional programs, provide a learning environment to develop and improve a student’s physical, emotional, and social abilities, leading to good health, well-being, and fitness. Students are provided with information designed to assist in decision-making concerning a wide range of adolescent health issues.

    NAME COURSE # GRADE LEVEL CREDITS
    5041 - Physical Education 9 5041 9 2 1.25
    5051 - Health 9 5051 9 2 1.25
    5042 - Physical Education 10 5042 10 2 1.25
    5055 - Health 10 5055 10 2 1.25
    5053 - Physical Education 11 5053 11 2 1.25
    5056 - Health 11 5056 11 2 1.25
    5054 - Physical Education 12 5054 12 2 1.25
    5057 - Health 12 5057 12 2 1.25

    5041 – PHYSICAL EDUCATION 9
    1.25 CREDITS

    This course provides freshmen a program of physical education activities designed to promote fitness as well as social and emotional well-being.

    5051 – HEALTH 9
    1.25 CREDITS

    This freshmen course is an introduction to health and wellness issues relating to teens and adults. Topics of interest are nutrition, reproduction, personal safety, wellness, consumer health, relationship issues, and healthy decision making.

    5042 – PHYSICAL EDUCATION 10
    1.25 CREDITS

    This course provides sophomores a program of physical education activities designed to promote fitness, as well as social and emotional well-being.

    5055 – HEALTH 10
    1.25 CREDITS

    This sophomore course is a continuation of Health and Wellness issues relating to teens and adults. Topics of interest include social emotional well-being, opiates and drugs, vaping and juuling.

    5053 – PHYSICAL EDUCATION 11
    1.25 CREDITS

    This course provides juniors a review of activities in Physical Education 9 & 10 with emphasis on individual fitness and a focus on lifelong fitness activities. Students will be required to keep a personal journal of their health and wellness activities and future goals.

    5056 - HEALTH 11
    1.25 CREDITS

    This junior course is a continuation of health and wellness issues relating to teens and adults. Topics of interest include stress, social emotional well-being, nutrition, and goal setting.

    5054 – PHYSICAL EDUCATION 12
    1.25 CREDITS

    This course provides seniors a review of activities in Physical Education 9, 10 & 11 with emphasis on individual fitness and a focus on lifelong fitness activities. Students will be required to keep a personal journal of their health and wellness activities and future goals.

    5057 – HEALTH 12
    1.25 CREDITS

    This senior course is a continuation of health and wellness issues relating to teens and adults. Topics of interest include stress, social emotional well-being, alcohol and life-long fitnes

Alternative Electives Course Selection

  • NAME COURSE # GRADE LEVEL CREDITS
    Spanish 1 4213 9-12 2 2.5
    Spanish 2 4214 9-12 2 2.5
    Portuguese 1 4313 9-12 2 2.5
    Portuguese 2 4314 9-12 2 2.5
    Career Readiness 1 5031 9 2 2.5
    Career Readiness 2 5052 10 2 2.5
    Virtual High School Half-year Course Varies 11-12 1, 2, 5 2.5
    Virtual High School Full-year Course Varies 11-12 1, 2, 5 5.0
    Medical Terminology 2500 11/12 2 2.5

    4213 – SPANISH I
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course introduces students to the Spanish language. Students learn vocabulary and concepts of basic grammar, allowing them to communicate information about themselves and others using simple sentences, both orally and in writing. The practice of all four language skills- listening, speaking, reading, and writing- helps students solidify their acquisition of the Spanish language. In addition, students become familiar with cultures of different Spanish speaking countries through a variety of multi-media resources. Active participation in class activities and completion of daily homework assignments are required.

    4214 – SPANISH II
    2.5 CREDITS

    At this level, the student will continue with the communicative approach of the level one course. The four language skills will be further refined with more emphasis on communication. This progression will act as a catalyst that will produce more authentic language situations. New grammatical principles are introduced, and common patterns of sound, order, and structure already learned are studied in greater depth. Vocabulary and grammar is introduced in thematic units that are centered on interdisciplinary and cultural themes. Oral activities are regularly used for practice of intonation, phrasing, and manner of expression. Students at this beginner level will continue to communicate clearly and effectively in stage one of language proficiency set forth by the Massachusetts Foreign Language Curriculum Frameworks.

    4313 – PORTUGUESE I
    2.5 CREDITS

    As an introductory language course, the first year will establish the foundation necessary for language acquisition through varied listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities in the target language. While it is imperative that students gain knowledge of the basic structures of the language, it is also important that they go beyond the simple manipulation of forms. Students are encouraged to think critically and take risks when expressing themselves in the language. In addition, students will be expected to communicate clearly and effectively in stage one of language proficiency set forth by the Massachusetts Foreign Language Curriculum Frameworks. Student assessment will include traditional quizzes and tests, roleplaying dialogs, oral/aural quizzes, journal entries, structural and cultural mini projects, and a major research project on target countries, primarily in English. Upon completion of Portuguese I, students perform simple communicative tasks using single words in naming articles in the classroom or listing their favorite foods. Students also use common phrases and expressions to complete simple tasks, such as saying “good morning” and stating their name, age, and where they live.

    4314 – PORTUGUESE II
    2.5 CREDITS

    At this level, the student will continue with the communicative approach of the level one course. The four language skills will be further refined with more emphasis on accuracy of expression. This progression will act as a catalyst that will produce more authentic language situations. There will be a wide variety of assessments used at this level involving both individual research and group activities. The primary objective is the preparation for reading, both for comprehension and for cultural appreciation. New grammatical principles are introduced, and common patterns of sound, order and structure already learned are studied in greater depth. In addition, the student will be expected to communicate clearly and effectively in stage one of language proficiency set forth by the Massachusetts Foreign Language Frameworks. Oral activities are regularly used for practice of intonation, phrasing, and manner of expression. A grade of C- or higher in Level I of the language is recommended. Student assessment will include, but is not limited to traditional quizzes and tests, role-playing dialogs, oral/aural quizzes, journal entries, structural and cultural mini-projects and two or more major projects: reflexive versus non-reflexive verbs, family project, designing a city, cookbook project, fashion show video or department store video. Upon completion of Portuguese II, students continue to perform simple communicative tasks using selected words, phrases, and expressions with no major repeated patterns of error.

    5031—CAREER READINESS I
    2.5 CREDITS

    Career Readiness I is a one-trimester course exposing students to the foundation skills in the areas of employability, management, business communication, and technology. This course addresses the Vocational Technical Education Framework Standardized Strand 4 (Employability and Career Readiness), Strand 5 (Management & Entrepreneurship), and Strand 6 (Technological). As part of the course, students will be required to complete course work in employability, professionalism, business communication, web research, digital citizenship, and Microsoft Word, Excel, and Power Point.

    5032—CAREER READINESS II
    2.5 CREDITS

    Career Readiness II is a one-trimester course exposing students to the foundation skills in the areas of employability, accounting, business law, and entrepreneurship practices, while continuing instruction in business communication. This course addresses the Vocational Technical Education Framework Standardized Strand 4 (Employability and Career Readiness), Strand 5 (Management & Entrepreneurship), and Strand 6 (Technological). As part of the course, students will be required to complete course work in the areas of employability, accounting, business law, entrepreneurship, and business communication.

    VIRTUAL HIGH SCHOOL
    2.5 CREDITS (HALF YEAR)
    5 CREDITS (FULL YEAR)

    As a member of the Virtual High School Collaborative, Diman Regional Vocational Technical High School (VHS) is now able to offer hundreds of additional online courses. The VHS program is open to juniors and seniors with a GPA of 3.0 or above. Students in VHS are given two or four periods in each academic rotation for their VHS class and are responsible for logging in and doing their classwork while in shop or on co-op. Learn more about Virtual High School here.

    2500 – MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
    2.5 CREDITS

    This course teaches the basic design of medical terminology as used in academic, business, and health institutions. Applying a unique instructional system of memory technology, the student learns to interpret and understand thousands of complex medical terms using root words, prefixes and suffixes. Comprehensive presentations of various body systems and anatomical structures provide a powerful foundation for technical language used in medical practices. No previous knowledge of biology, anatomy, or physiology is needed.